Senior School

GCSE Classics

Latin GCSE (WJEC)

GCSE Latin helps you to:
  • improve your communication skills
  • expand your English vocabulary by looking at Latin roots
  • learn vocabulary in other European languages
  • develop awareness of how languages work
  • understand the influence of Roman civilisation on modern culture
  • understand what the Romans had to say in their own words
The WJEC course leads to the award of TWO certificates: Certificate in Latin Language and Roman Civilisation/Certificate in Latin Literature.
 
Each certificate is equivalent to one GCSE, so this is a double award qualification.
 
We continue to use the Cambridge Latin Course in S4/Y10 and S5/Y11. With the city of Rome as a backdrop, the stories explore the lives of rich and poor, the spread of Christianity and the intrigues of the Imperial Court.
 
We arrange trips to enhance the learning from the course, such as a workshop at the Museum of London, a visit to Sheffield Magistrates’ Court, and a curator-led event at the Museum of Bath.
 
For the Certificate in Latin Language and Roman Civilisation, language skills are tested in an exam, by unseen translation and comprehension, for which there is a defined vocabulary list. One topic of civilisation is studied, such as life in Roman Britain, and can be tested by examination or controlled assessment. The study of primary source material develops skills in analyzing, evaluating and responding to evidence.
 
For the Certificate in Latin Literature, we read prose and verse literature in the original Latin language. There are two topics: Themes, eg Leisure, or Love and Marriage, and Narratives, eg Aeneid Book II, or Nero and Agrippina. Knowledge of these texts can be tested by examination or controlled assessment.
 
Latin is an option which is regarded very highly by universities and employers.
 

Classical Greek GCSE (OCR)

Classical Greek helps you to:
  • expand your English vocabulary by looking at Greek roots
  • learn vocabulary in other European languages
  • development awareness of how languages work
  • understand the influence of Ancient Greek civilisation on modern culture
  • understand what the Greeks had to say in their own words
Students who have begun learning Classical Greek in S3/Y9 may continue through to take GCSE in S5/Y11 by attending two lunchtime sessions per week. They either take the full GCSE or the GCSE (Short Course). We arrange trips to enhance the course, e.g. the Cambridge Greek Play.
 
The OCR course:Language skills are tested by unseen translation and comprehension (written examination). There is a defined vocabulary list. Language skills make up 50% of the GCSE award.
 
We also choose from a range of units on Literature and Sources for Greek Civilisation. The literature is studied in the original Greek, e.g. Homer’s epic account of Odysseus’ encounter with the Cyclops, or Antiphon’s legal speech ‘The Murder of Herodes’. Knowledge of these texts is tested by examination. The Sources for Greek Civilisation are studied in English, using evidence to explore topics such as democracy, athletics and the theatre.
 

Classical Civilisation GCSE (OCR)

What is Classical Civilisation?

Classical Civilisation is the study of ancient Greece and Rome, and it is open to any student in S4/Y10. Studying the classical world gives our students an extra perspective on how societies work and why the modern world has developed in the way that it has. Classical literature is interesting and exciting to read in its own right. Stories from the Iliad and Odyssey have been used in several epic films like “Troy”. Students do not need to have studied Latin or Greek at all since the source materials are in English. Classical Civilisation is a humanities subject and is highly respected by both employers and universities.

GCSE

There are four modules at GCSE, each of equal value. Three of these are chosen from:
 
  • City life in the classical city of either Athens or Rome
  • The Odyssey or Ovid’s Metamorphoses
  • A study of the community life of either Pompeii
  • Sparta.
These topics are examined by short factual questions and evaluation of source materials.
The fourth module is a research project which is written up as a controlled assessment in lesson time. The areas for research are:
 
  • Antigone, a tragedy by Sophocles
  • Lysistrata, a comedy by Aristophanes
  • The letters of Pliny
  • The Aeneid of Virgil
  • The ancient Olympic games
  • Roman Britain

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